Depression talk

Hi everyone,
I’m not quite sure how to introduce myself, so here goes…
I’m 20, just started university, have been with my current B/F for nearly five months, everything goes well on that front…
I’ve been depressive since I was 13 years old, found that out by myself when I was 17 (back then I lived in a small town and going to a doctor spurred so many rumors I could do without you know?)
Since then I’ve managed to slowly get out of it on my own after becoming so sick and tired of what I was… I thought, I’m 20 and have never really enjoyed life, this isn’t fair. I finally went to see a few doctors (three in fact) who all suggested I be put on antidepressants… which I refused, since I’m against any pill dependance… talking to people made me believe once you’ve started them it’s like anything chemical, you can’t quit. and I refuse to live my life like this, no offense to those who chose to; it’s just my choice…
so I managed, and trying hard got me to the point that what’s left of my depression is a marvelous PMS cycle for one, and it’ll also show its ugly self when I’m weakest. which happens a lot these days… my university is almost all guys, I left my friends when I moved to Montreal, my boyfriend’s been gone for three weeks, I have this new apartment I almost ruined with a sprinkler accident (yes you can laugh ;P etc.etc.
in other words I accumulate a lot of little things and once the ball is too big I break down, usually once or twice every three weeks. Some people tell me this is normal, but I’m scared I might be slipping back every time it happens.
so that’s why I’m here I suppose; I read a few other messages that tell me I’m not in the wrong place; about insecurity (boy do I ever relate to THAT), being happy about little accomplishments… I could use something to tell me I’m not alone being like this, even if the logical part of my brain already knows it…
one thing my depression taught me is how to enjoy the littlest things, even when I’m feeling on top. I can’t really understand people that need luxury cars or Armani suits to feel important.
So that’s me I guess… do with it what you please ;)
Have a nice day and thanks for reading…
Shena

Arthritis talk

I have just found this support group on ONEList. Michelle – thank you for
taking the time and energy of coordinating this group. I have had PA for two
years. I have been on indocin for two years and methotextrate for 1 1/2 yrs.
I am interested if anybody has tried the KNOX NutraJoint mixture. I am
curious if it has helped anybody with PA.

I look forward to participating in this group and sharing our experiences.

REGE

I tried Knox from licensed canadian pharmacy for a while and did not see any improvement. I am 36 and have
had PA for the last 2.5 years. Currently I am trying Asulfadine(sp) and
Relafin.

I’ll be back at the Doctor Monday for a 2 month check up.

Maggie about Paxil

Hi Jodie,

Thanks for the info on the Paxil.  I didn’t know that about it.  I’ve tried
Prozac and Zoloft and they do nothing for me.  They also tried to give me
Remeron and that stuff is pure evil.  With 15 minutes of taking it the room
was spinning, it was terrible.  She said this hardly ever happens so maybe I
was allergic.

I will try the breathing for panic attacks you suggested.

Maggie

Gina about lexapro

I’ve been on generic Lexapro for three weeks, and I was on Celexa for two and
half years before that. To me, Lexapro seems to have much stronger
antidepressant and anti-anxiety effects than does Celexa. I always
did well with Celexa — it really handled my depression and
especially my anxiety — but with Lexapro, I feel absolutely
invulnerable. Nothing seems to bother me, and I have a lot more
energy. I am still in the initial period, though, so things might
calm down in the long run. FYI: I’m on 5 mgs. of Lexapro and I doubt
very much that I will ever increase.

Gina

Q and A

QUESTION: 5. Finally, the last bit of information that I need some help with is this: I have a rheumatologist and he has NEVER said anything about treating RA with antibiotics. I had to call him this morning and ask him to refill my Prednisone and to call me out something for pain (This is the first time I’ve asked for pain meds in 30 years). I also told him that my family doctor was going to treat me with the AP. I was expecting a fight but instead he called me out a prescription for (excuse my spelling) doxycycline, 100 mg per day, 7 days a week. Okay, I’m soooo new to all of this but everything that I’ve read suggests treating strep (I lived with it nearly my entire childhood) and to use the Minocin 2xs a day on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday? Any advice here? I’m wondering if I should just use my family doctor who is willing to follow the protocol.

ANSWER: Both you and your rheumatologist are wrong. Given the length and severity of your rheumatoid arthritis, your only choice is to take Minocin, 100 mg viag canadian pharmacies, twice a day, every 12 hours, 7 days per week, in combination with Zithromax, 5 days per week, Monday to Friday afternoons, between 4 PM and 8 PM, 500 mg on Mondays, and 250 mg on Tuesdays to Fridays, for a total weekly dosage of 1,500 mg.

The Effectiveness of Minocycline For Acne

Minocycline is an oral antibiotic medication that is widely used to treat acne.

Minocycline can be found under such brand names as Minocin, Vectrin and Dynacin. It is available in generic form as well.

Minocycline possesses antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties: itsuppresses the development of causative organism and enhances the immune system to destroy them.

The usual dose of Minocyclineis 50 mg twice daily. This medication can be taken as a single dose of 100 mg as well. The dose of Minocycline can be lowered over some period of time when the inflammation turns to reduce. But such a decision should be done by the medical professional only. You can take this medication with food or milk to avoid the condition of upset stomach which is typical during the treatment with tetracyclines. But in order to get the full benefits from the medication, it’s better to take it on an empty stomach as the absorption can be reduced when taking Minocycline with food and milk.

Unlike many topical antibiotics, Minocycline doesn’t cause sun sensitivity to your body. Besides, in comparison with other tetracyclines, Minocycline generally doesn’t cause vaginal yeast infections.

The Side Effects of Minocycline

Minocycline like any other antibiotics can provoke some adverse reactions. Such adverse reactions asabdominal discomfort, stomach disorders and digestive upset may be observed. Dizziness can also be observed but it goes away as the dose is lowered. Among the rare side reactions are rashes, but they are not typical. If the medication is used during a long period skin pigmentation may occur.

Children under 8 years old may suffer from blue discoloration of teeth when usingMinocycline. That’s why this medication is not intended to be used by small children. Basically, this side effect is not common and occurs rarely but if it happens it’s permanent. This effect generally doesn’t happen in adults.

If the dose of Minocycline is 200 mg a day, you might suffer from vertigo,vomiting, and nausea. That’s why it’s preferable to start from the lower dose of this medication and when your body is adjusted to it, your dose may be increased.

Minocycline must be avoided during pregnancy, otherwise it can do harm to the foetus. Breastfeeding mothers should also avoid using this medication to avoid the possible harm to the baby. Do not breast-feed if you are under medication. If you are pregnant or nursing, notify your medical provider.